Category Archives: Events

Enviroant network panels at 2020 EASA Conference

ENVIROANT NETWORK PANELS AT THE 16TH EASA BIENNIAL CONFERENCE “NEW ANTHROPOLOGICAL HORIZONS IN AND BEYOND EUROPE” 21-24 JULY 2020 IN LISBON

P019 Privileged fear: Europe and the concern for environmental catastrophes
Convenors: Aet Annist (University of Tartu), Nina Moeller (Coventry University)
Discussant: Thomas Hylland Eriksen (University of Oslo)

P162 Wet horizons: hydrosocial re-articulations in the Anthropocene
Convenors: Franz Krause (University of Cologne), Sandro Simon (University of Cologne), Nora Horisberger (University of Cologne), Werner Krauß (University of Bremen), Benoit Ivars (University of Cologne)

https://easaonline.org/networks/enviroant/events.shtml

Report from enviroant network INAUGURAL workshop

 The inaugural workshop of the EASA Environment and Anthropology (EnviroAnt) Network took place in Cologne, Germany, on December 12th and 13th, 2019. A motivated group of 60 registered participants (including 29 presenters) came together to discuss the theme “Perspectives and stories in a world of facts and figures? Exploring the potential of anthropology in tackling environmental issues.” 

Comprising 3 keynotes and 25 Pecha Kucha presentations, the workshop provided opportunity for the members of the recently founded network to get to know each other’s work, develop the purposes and strategies of the network, and plan possible collaborations. Based on the conviction that environmental anthropology can contribute to alternative and more just futures, the organizers placed the exploration of possible ways to do so at the heart of this inaugural meeting. The workshop thus explored the potential for anthropologists, and anthropological insights, in contributing to public debates and solution attempts for current environmental issues. 

Participants shared their diverse experiences of linking up with policy and practice, exchanged some of the methods that they have found useful to this end, and critically discussed the potential benefits and harms that providing anthropological knowledge in these circles may cause. 

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